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Here We Go ‘Round the Superfruit Bush: Why Mulberries are Your New Favorite Snack
It seems like nursery rhymes are heard less and less in America, but I’m sure most of us can remember the one about going ‘round a mulberry bush—I think because it involved running in a type of shark pack around an unsuspecting person or thing. But what we didn’t know then is how darn good mulberries are for your health!
 
Discovered Abroad
When I was a child, I had never seen a mulberry bush; I didn’t even know the “berry” party referred to edible berries. There are plenty of berries that you certainly cannot eat: holly berries, yew berries, juniper berries, inkberries. However, traveling in China, I rediscovered the mulberry in all its parti-colored glory.  Fact: Mulberries don’t grow on bushes; they actually grow on trees!
 
And they’re delicious! During the summer, people delight in the tangy-sweet fruit, and for good reason. But the Chinese don’t eat the berries simply for their mouth-watering flavor. Chinese medicine has had recourse to the healing power of mulberries for thousands of years. Known as Sang in Chinese, they are used as a blood tonic, a kidney purifier, a beauty enhancer, and an anti-aging treatment. How can all of these uses possibly come from one little berry? The secret lies in its color and taste.
It seems like nursery rhymes are heard less and less in America, but I’m sure most of us can remember the one about going ‘round a mulberry bush—I think because it involved running in a type of shark pack around an unsuspecting person or thing. But what we didn’t know then is how darn good mulberries are for your health!
 
Discovered Abroad
When I was a child, I had never seen a mulberry bush; I didn’t even know the “berry” party referred to edible berries. There are plenty of berries that you certainly cannot eat: holly berries, yew berries, juniper berries, inkberries. However, traveling in China, I rediscovered the mulberry in all its parti-colored glory.  Fact: Mulberries don’t grow on bushes; they actually grow on trees!
 
And they’re delicious! During the summer, people delight in the tangy-sweet fruit, and for good reason. But the Chinese don’t eat the berries simply for their mouth-watering flavor. Chinese medicine has had recourse to the healing power of mulberries for thousands of years. Known as Sang in Chinese, they are used as a blood tonic, a kidney purifier, a beauty enhancer, and an anti-aging treatment. How can all of these uses possibly come from one little berry? The secret lies in its color and taste.
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Ideas: Women's, Menopause, Mulberry

GuideID: 58770

Guide Type: Hot Topics

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