When you gotta go, you gotta go!


We all know how the saying goes: When you gotta go, you gotta go! But let's face it, sometimes we gotta go at the most inappropriate times and places. For instance, you may laugh so hard at a friend's get-together that you accidentally leak on her off-white, name-brand sofa.

Or, you might be speaking at a convention when you start to feel a little tingle between your legs. You wave it off, thinking you can hold it until the end, but before you know it, that tingle is now tinkling down your pantyhose and into your best heels—in front of everyone! Didn't feel that one coming, did you? Truth is, sometimes, you just can't.
 
 
What's Incontinence?
Urinary incontinence is the inability to control the flow of urine. It's a condition that can be socially disengaging, and problematic when it comes to maintaining good hygiene. And honestly, it can be downright embarrassing. Unfortunately, it is a common, and growing, problem among most aging women, affecting almost half of our entire species. But what on earth causes this miserable condition in the first place?
 
How Does Urinary Incontinence Happened?
Urinary incontinence can occur due to the decline of estradiol and testosterone levels during menopause. Lowered testosterone weakens the pelvic floor and urethral sphincter, both of whose main job is to support and control the bladder; and the thinned endometrium—accompanied by an increase in the vaginal pH as a direct cause of lowered estrogen—results in mechanical weakness.

Ergo, you're unable to control involuntary urination. But, luckily for you, there's a solution for that.

Let the Herballove Community Help You
If you share, we will care. By sharing your details and concerns, our experienced members provide answers, advice and solutions to your incontinence problems.

  Got questions for Teresa?...Check her out
  See Saphie's Blog & find out her recommendation
  More on Nancy's tips...visit her blog
  Read Alexis's Blog here and sign-up to ask her
  Discover the answers to other incontinence issues...read Cheri's Blog
  Get second opinion from me...See Melissa's Blog

Straight talk from our experienced experts. Get the answers by posting your questions below.

So It's This Part of Getting Old
Overactive Bladder and urinary incontinence caused by menopause can prove to be extremely stressful, and frustrating to deal with; but there are many natural solutions for treating this condition, such as the ones found here in Stop Urinary Miseries - Botanical Remedy for Postmenopausal Women. Herbs like water-soluble pumpkin seed has been proven to alleviate urinary difficulties by aiding in the tissue-building of the pelvic floor muscles, as well as by regulating testosterone levels.

What Else Can I Do
To further help with balancing hormone levels, you can enlist the aid of another herb, soy isoflavone, which contains phyto-estrogens. Multiple studies involving groups of middle-aged women have shown huge improvements in both nighttime and daytime urination with the consumption of these herbs; they're sleeping better at night, and enjoying an out-and-about life during the day—without the hassles of constant urination.

What to do


Stop Urinary Miseries - Botanical Remedy for Postmenopausal Women

Menopausal women suffering from bladder incontinence have weakened pelvic floor muscles. By taking this botanical formula, women can strengthen their pelvic floor muscles thanks to the herbs found inside. Read more
5
Average: 5 (1 vote)


2 comments



Comments

Oceanwater077's picture
Oceanwater077 posted on Thu, 05/22/2014 - 10:27
I could never imagine speaking in front of people and something tingling down my legs. I remember a few years ago there was a singer who was at a concert and you were clearly able to visibly see some brownish/redish fluid down her legs. I wonder if she had trouble with urinary incontinence. If that was me and I felt it coming down my legs I would have left in an instant.
Copyright © HerbalLove. All rights reserved.

The information on this site is provided for informational purposes and is not meant to substitue for medical or physician advice, diagnosis, or treatment.
See the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.