Intercourse Pain - articles

Spice Things Up By Slicking Them Down: An Introduction to Personal Lubricants

Your stomach growls to remind you to eat something. You get lightheaded until you drink enough water. And when a woman is turned on, her vagina gets wet. However, there's no universal measure for the “right” amount; some women's bodies are naturally generous, others are stingy. It's also possible that the signals to open the valve are getting scrambled, letting out too much or not enough. Try to see it as “getting” to figure out the amount of lubricant that works best for you, as part of taking control of your own sex life.
 
Grinding To A Halt
Read more

How To Treat Painful Sex

Intercourse remains a natural way for couples to interact and demonstrate love and affection. But if she experiences pain during penetration, she won’t be satisfied—or happy. Pain during sex remains a normal part of a woman’s life, but it doesn’t have to be.
 
Causes
Read more

Water-Based Lubrication: A Starter Guide for Improved Intimacy

In the early 1900s, the first modern condom was created. Like most modern creations, the early condom sucked. It was thick, cumbersome to put on, and came with a foul, grotesque smell.

It also came from the inside of a cow or pig, the intestine to be exact.
Read more

Pain & Pleasure - Intercourse Pain Caused By Chronic Vibrating Pleasure

Vibrators can please. Vibrators can relieve. Vibrators can too be a tease.   The overuse of a vibrator can damage nerves and desensitize the clitoris. Too much abuse of these pleasure toys can abrade and score the tissue inside and outside the vaginal walls.
 
Pleasure or Pain
Read more

Breast Feeding & Intercourse Pain - How Are They Linked?

Some breastfeeding women experienced intercourse pain might not aware that her hormone productions and monthly menstrual cycle were affected by breastfeeding. In fact, breastfeeding can suppress monthly menstrual cycle by overproducting prolactin (for milk production) and underproducing other hormones such as estrogen and progesterone (regulating menstrual cycle). In some severe cases, few breastfeeding women would experiencing symptoms similar to menopause due to depletion of estrogen. 
Read more

Is Vibrator The Cause For Your Intercourse Pain?

Vibrators enhance masturbation but overuse can damage nerves and desensitize the clitoris and vagina, leading to an inability to achieve orgasm. Read more

For Some People Sex Cause Pain, Not Pleasure

Sex is fun. Sex is healthy. Sex is pleasing. When sex is painful, it can depreciative the desire to have it. Men and women can both experience pain during intercourse. Some pain may be a result of a sexually transmitted disease, such as gonorrhea or syphilis; other sources of pain may include vibrator or penis pump damage. Birth control pills, a tipped uterus and even excessive ejaculation can also cause make sex painful.
 
Injury to Organs
Read more

Pleasure & Pain - How vaginal over-stimulation can lead to intercourse pain

According to recent research on female sexuality, a great number of women experience pain during sex. They all seem to have certain factors in common with their sexual histories; over-masturbation, over-sex and the use of sex toys such as vibrators. Read more

Rehmannia - The Healing Flower of China

Rehmannia is a genus of six species of flowering plants native to China. It is a perennial herb with large flowers that grows up to a height of nearly two feet. In Europe and North America, it is often simply bred as a decorative garden plant. Read more

Vaginal Spasms & Intercourse Pain

Vaginal Spasm (Vaginismus) is a conditioned reflex of the pubococcygeus (PC) muscle, which causes muscles in the vagina to tense suddenly, making any kind of vaginal penetration either painful or impossible, including sexual penetration, insertion of tampons and gynecological examinations. Read more

Pages

Copyright © HerbalLove. All rights reserved.

The information on this site is provided for informational purposes and is not meant to substitue for medical or physician advice, diagnosis, or treatment.
See the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.