The Workout Designed for a Tight Vagina: Use Kegel Balls, Enjoy Sex

Jean Dohm's picture
By Jean Dohm Conditions: Women'sVaginal Looseness

Oh, the myths about vaginas. Sex makes them loose, birth turns them to floppy bags and virgins are tighter make the most common rumors. We’re here to give you the truth: located in the abdomen are muscles known as the pelvic floor. Without proper use, or with overstretching, these muscles become weak. In turn, women feel this weakness in problems like urinary incontinence and loose vaginal walls.
 
Something else you need to know is this: women of all ages can experience a weak pelvic floor. We tend to think of haggard women over 60 or mothers of 10 as the only ones with vaginal problems. But pelvic floor muscles can be weakened by lots of common factors: heavy lifting, obesity, chronic cough, and repeated constipation, just to name a few.
 
What’s a Girl to do?
When she was 20, Arbor slept with her first real boyfriend. She’d been hoping for love and romance, but she got criticism instead. “He said my vagina was so loose he couldn’t orgasm,” she recalls. “I was mortified. I swore I’d never have sex again.”
 
Arbor eventually put that relationship behind her. Time and distance helped her decide to sleep with her next boyfriend. He wasn’t quite as blunt as the first, but he also commented on her vaginal looseness. “He basically said the same thing – I needed to tighten my vagina – without being so harsh,” Arbor says. “In tears, I asked him what I could do. I was suffering, again out of embarrassment but also because I couldn’t relax during sex.”
 
Arbor’s boyfriend didn’t consider her question to be rhetorical. “He looked at me very seriously and told me to strengthen my pelvic floor,” Arbor remembers. “Before that moment, I’d never even heard the term. But as a medical student, he had more knowledge of the female body than I. It was ironic.”
 
Your Guide to the Pelvic Floor
Fortunately, we also have some knowledge of the female anatomy. Here’s what you need to know: the pelvic floor is a thin layer of muscle that runs from the pubic bone to the tail bone. Because this muscle sits below the vagina, bladder and rectum, it helps support all three organs. But that support comes with a price – a weak pelvic floor translates to a loose vagina.
 
“Prompted by my boyfriend, I learned more about the pelvic floor than I ever wanted,” Arbor says. “When it’s strong, vaginal walls are tight and firm. When it’s weak, the walls lose their foundation and start to sag.”
 
What is the solution? In a word, exercise.
 
For a Strong Pelvic Floor
“Every other muscle in the body has to be worked, so why not the pelvic floor?” questions Arbor. “It just makes sense. The best workout is sex, but to really tone the muscle, I used Kegel balls.”
 
If at this point you have envisioned large plastic balls you either juggle or catch, don’t worry – that’s not the intended exercise. Rather, Kegel balls are inserted directly into the vagina. They’re small but weighted so you have to use your muscles to keep them in place. (SEE: Vaginal Looseness Restoration with Kegel Balls) After 15 minutes you remove them and, with a few repeated tries, your pelvic floor will be stronger.
 
“They worked for me,” Arbor says with a smile. “My boyfriend and I have been together four years. Sex is amazing – I’m so tight, he has to stop himself from coming too quickly. I recommend Kegel balls for every woman. The importance of vaginal health – even to prevent incontinence – cannot be overstated.”

What to do


Kegel Balls For Vaginal Looseness and Incontinence

If you’ve ever constructed a paper airplane, you’ve noticed the short lifespan of paper. Read more
0
No votes yet


0 comments



Copyright © HerbalLove. All rights reserved.

The information on this site is provided for informational purposes and is not meant to substitue for medical or physician advice, diagnosis, or treatment.
See the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.